Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle

Healthy LifeThe Healthy Lifestyle Course (HLTH1010) is a compulsory, one-year course for undergraduates to learn how to maintain a well-balanced and healthy lifestyle that will help them to effectively manage their life, learning and work. Ideally, the amount and types of food we eat should be tailored to who we are – our genetic predisposition to gaining weight, how we metabolise sugars, how we store fat, and other physiological fluxes that are beyond the scope of scientific instruction at the moment, and perhaps forever. With more than 50 stores across the country, we have been helping Australians look and feel better for almost 50 years with everyday natural health solutions, the best range of natural, organic and eco-friendly products, and expert advice by our qualified health practitioners.

Our body is our temple and we need to take care of it. Do you know that over 70% of Americans are either obese or overweight? 1 That’s insane! Think of your body as your physical shell to take you through life. If you repeatedly abuse it, your shell will wear out quickly. Stress and anxiety can affect anyone at any time and can have consequences on job, family and health. Find out how to sleep better, beat the blues, do more and feel more confident in yourself.

Eating healthy food can lower your risk of developing health problems, help manage health problems like heart disease and diabetes, and also make you feel good. Healthy eating might help your asthma. Regular physical activity is important for the healthy growth, development and well-being of children and young people.

7 Walk regularly Aerobic exercise, including something as uncomplicated and low-impact as walking, is associated with a variety of benefits for the body and the brain, including a reduced risk of chronic diseases, anti-anxiety and mood-enhancing effects. Aim for a total of about 30 minutes of brisk walking every day.

It sounds far-fetched, but our society has already made great strides towards that goal, thanks to advances in medicine and improvements in healthy living. In 2014, for instance, the United States Health Interview Survey reported that 16% of people aged between 50 and 64 were impaired every day with chronic illness. Three decades earlier that number was 23%. In other words, as well as benefiting from longer lifespans, we are also experiencing longer healthspans” – and the latter is proving to be even more malleable. To paraphrase and update a speech from John F Kennedy given at the first White House Conference on Ageing in 1961, life can indeed be added to years, rather than just years added to life.