Healthy Lifestyle Hub

Healthy LifeThe continuing rise of lifestyle-related diseases and chronic disorders means that we need to take a fresh look at health and healthcare, and to remember that prevention is better than cure. Learn how to recognize causes of stress, such as difficult people, financial matters, noise, lack of time, or high pressure situations. Review your daily activities periodically in search of triggers you may not be aware of look for patterns in your symptoms and stress levels. You may want to discuss your stressors with your doctor or therapist.

Changing the time of day you take your medication may help you sleep. Discuss your medication, its side effects, dosage, and time of day taken with your doctor. Do not smoke. Smoking can cause preventable diseases such as lung cancer and other cancers. Stay away from secondhand smoke, since this can also be hazardous to your health.

When you were first diagnosed with a mood disorder, you may have felt powerless or afraid. This page will suggest ways to empower yourself and play an active role in the way you live day-to-day with your illness. Regular appointments with your health care provider and attendance at DBSA support group meetings, in addition to the suggestions outlined here, can put a healthy lifestyle within your reach.

We all need some fat in our diet, but it’s important to pay attention to the amount and type of fat we’re eating. There are two main types of fat: saturated and unsaturated. Too much saturated fat can increase the amount of cholesterol in the blood, which increases your risk of developing heart disease.

Kate Lorig, RN, DrPH, is a director and associate professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine’s Patient Education Research Center. She lives in Mountain View, California. Halsted Holman, MD, is professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He lives in Stanford, California. David Sobel, MD, is the director of patient education and health promotion at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in Northern California. He lives in San Jose, California. Diana Laurent, MPH, is a health educator at the Stanford University School of Medicine’s Patient Education Research Center. She lives in Palo Alto, California. Virginia Gonzalez, MPH, is a health educator at the Stanford University School of Medicine’s Patient Education Research Center. She lives in San Jose, California. Marion Minor, PT, PhD, is an assistant professor at the University of Missouri in the department of physical therapy. She lives in Columbia, Missouri.