AIA Healthy Living

Healthy LifeA healthy lifestyle is one which helps to keep and improve people’s health and well-being. Becoming more active is key to combatting obesity and to keeping healthy in general. Encourage your children to take up extracurricular activities that involve exercise: go swimming in summer, take up a sport or go to a dance class. Make family outings healthy too: why not organise a trip to the beach or the park. And here’s another idea: start going on a family walk after dinner instead of flopping in front of television. The key is also in your diet and eating habits: cut out junk and sugary food and avoid eating in front of the TV.

Avoid eating a large meal before sleeping to decrease gastroesophageal reflux and weight gain. Get the latest tips on diet, exercise and healthy living. Eat fermentable fibers. When we eat, we aren’t just eating for ourselves — we are eating for the bacteria in our gut too. In order for the good bacteria to flourish, we need fermentable fiber, which is food for the good gut bacteria.

Healthy life expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years babies born this year would live in a state of ‘good’ general health if mortality levels at each age, and the level of good health at each age, remain constant in the future. Similarly, healthy life expectancy at age 65 is the average number of remaining years a man or woman aged 65 will live in ‘good general health’ if mortality levels and the level of good health at each age beyond 65 remain constant in the future.

The Y aims to improve the nation’s health and well-being by providing programs and activities that promote wellness, reduce risk for disease and help others reclaim their health. These programs and everything else the Y does are in service of making us—our Ys and our communities—better. The result is a country that values health and communities that support healthy choices. The Y. For a better us.

HLY is a functional health status measure that is increasingly used to complement the conventional life expectancy measures. The HLY measure was developed to reflect the fact that not all years of a person’s life are typically lived in perfect health. Chronic disease, frailty, and disability tend to become more prevalent at older ages, so that a population with a higher life expectancy may not be healthier. Indeed, a major question with an aging population is whether increases in life expectancy will be associated with a greater or lesser proportion of the future population spending their years living with disability. If HLY is increasing more rapidly than life expectancy in a population, then not only are people living longer, they are also living a greater portion of their lives free of disability.